What is the evidence of a pre-First Peoples rainforest dominant landscape?

W.D Jackson did a very neat comparison with the South Island of NZ which had a comparable climate, generally without people, to show the transformation from a rainforest dominant landscape to a fire managed open plains, woods and forests arranged for game and wildlife.

WD Jackson (1999) “The Tasmanian Legacy of Man and Fire” P&P Royal Society Tas.133, pp1-14.

Peter Dombrovskis: Myrtle tree

Peter Dombrovskis: Myrtle tree ((Nothofagus cunninghamii), in rainforest Mount Ann, Southwest Tasmania. Rainforest Myrtles are susceptible to fire and when burned are succeeded by Wattle and then Eucalyptus. This is how you can observe the landscape and discern Aboriginal landscape practice.

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A Vast Estate Managed with Purpose

In 2011 Bill Gammage published his controversial, The Biggest Estate of Earth: How the Aborigines made Australia. He refuted the idea of Aborigines as nomadic wanderers idling across the landscape. Instead, he saw the Aborigines as landscape managers, modifying and maintaining a vast Estate, a giant “gentleman’s park.”

White intrusion interrupted Indigenous landscape maintenance by fire and mosaic burning which meant an eruption of fire vulnerable regrowth that cause catastrophic bushfires today.

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What does past practice mean in the present?

The substantial alteration to the landscape by First Peoples does not give permission for us to treat the present landscape as a blank slate to be scribbled on.

White intrusion interrupted Indigenous landscape maintenance by fire and mosaic burning which meant an eruption of fire vulnerable regrowth that cause catastrophic bushfires today.

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Why multiple names for the river?

Many languages use generic names with adjectival qualifiers e.g “Grey Kangaroo” where “Kangaroo” is the basic word for the animal and “grey” is an adjectival qualifier that broadens our understanding of the basic generic word.
Aboriginal languages tend to use separate, multiple terms instead, so that “grey kangaroo” or “pregnant kangaroo” would be distinct words yet in the understanding of the First People it is assumed we are talking about the same creature with different aspects.

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